Sunday, August 12, 2012

Parasol

Down beside the willow water
Came the Reverend Wilson's daughter,
Looking for the one who loves to kiss her perfect face.

Across her shoulder, three times spun,
Her parasol to stop the sun;
White and new and edged with such a pretty ring of lace.

Back-buttoned dresses need a friend,
With eager fingers sweet to lend
A turn, a touch, and anything Miss Wilson might request.

The Reverend sent his man to check,
But all he found upon the deck:
A lace-edged parasol there tilted mistress-less at rest.

He dove into the willow water,
Fearful for the Reverend's daughter,
Who if she lost her breath, it came from quite another cause!

Presently, she came along,
Collected up her parasol,
Then, smiling, spun its lacy edge and walked back to the house.
______



 

22 comments:

hedgewitch said...

I've heard there's nobody wild as the preacher's daughter, except the sheriff's son. The twirl of lace, and popping of buttons make a lovely summer serenade by the willow water, if you ask me, and could leave anyone breathless.

Mama Zen said...

This just sings!

Margaret said...

Honestly, I didn't want it to end. The music with the staticy sound is perfect. I want more of this wayward preacher's daughter.

Sioux said...

With all the clothes girls/women wore in those days, I'm surprised the buttons didn't pop more often due to spontaneous combustion.

Of course, I got to the second stanza before I notice the rhyme scheme, since it was so seamless...

Susan said...

Ah! Wonderful! Silent movie Music--and a modern twist on the melodrama when the maiden does not need saving. I love how the parasol takes center stage and this unique and irreverent verse:
"Back-buttoned dresses need a friend,
With eager fingers sweet to lend
A turn, a touch, and anything Miss Wilson might request."

Mimi Foxmorton said...

Oh! Oh!

Being Historically Displaced.....and a lover of all this parasol I simply didn't want this splendid story to end!

It *really* needs to be a novel..for reading on a lovely summer day......

More, please....?

Kerry O'Connor said...

So, so beautiful, with the tell-tale edge of wry humour. I love the form you used - the touch of rhyme is very feminine.

aprille said...

An absolutely brilliant bit of fluff. What's the tune?

Helen said...

... I saw spinning lace parasols in a rainbow of pastel colors (swear) as I read this. Yes, it needs a tune. (think Emmylou)

insanebloom said...

pretty write...love the parasol :)

razzamadazzle said...

Oh, I love it! I too want more of this story.

Daryl said...

maybe this is why i keep seeing so many toting parasols this summer

Laurie Kolp said...

Naughty and nice.

Sherry Blue Sky said...

Gotta love a girl with a parasol - and a satisfied smile:)

awakenedwords said...

what the reverend don't know....

myheartslovesongs.com said...

apparently the reverend knows his daughter since he sent his man to check... hope the poor man didn't drown trying to rescue her!

great musical accompaniment.

delightful!

rosemary mint said...

I love the rhyme scheme and lengthier third line in each stanza. Very effective at creating the cadence of a slow stroll along water's edge.

These are my favorites:
"Looking for the one who loves to kiss her perfect face."

"Back-buttoned dresses need a friend,
With eager fingers sweet to lend"

"Presently, she came along,
Collected up her parasol,
Then, smiling, spun its lacy edge and walked back to the house." ... Just as innocent as you please. :)

cloudia charters said...

Ah the lacy edge. . . .



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mysinsations said...

They say "preacher's kids are always the worst!" Very whimsical poem!

Barbara said...

Spot on! Just the right touch with the rhyme and the smile. Loved it.

Kay L. Davies said...

I love this, Shay. The parasol is wonderful, and a great help in romantic situations, either to take along or to leave behind.
And the music...all my life I've wanted a pink honky-tonk player piano — a player piano because I can't play, and honky-tonk because I believe that's what upright pianos were made for, and pink just for fun.
You made me very happy with this post.
K

sharplittlepencil.com said...

Shay, what a saucy maid! Loved your form in this, and the parasol is not only a lovely picture but an image laden with meaning, the protection from the sun, but also (like Japanese women), an object used for flirtation. Love how the guy came to her "rescue," and I'm sending this to Riley, who is a preacher's stepdaughter... and the sweetest little dyke you'll ever meet. Peace, Amy
http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/08/15/blissful-balm-imaginary-garden-with-real-toads/